Tag Archives: government

A Government Right to Privacy? Thoughts from Maharrey Head #121

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“10 Minutes Closer to Freedom” Does the government have a “right to privacy?” Some cop thinks so. In this episode of Thoughts from Maharrey Head, I explain why he’s full of crap. LISTEN You can subscribe to Thoughts from Maharrey Head for free on iTunes. Just click HERE. You can also listen on my YouTube channel HERE. SHOW […]

The Constitution Isn’t Silly Putty: Thoughts from Maharrey Head #102

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“10 Minutes Closer to Freedom” A lot of people seem to think the Constitution is Silly Putty. The call it “malleable” and claim politicians can shape it into any form that fits the current political climate. They’re wrong. In fact, the whole point of a written Constitution was to ensure that powers of government were […]

Thoughts from Maharrey Head #30: Gridlock Isn’t Necessarily a Bad Thing

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“10 Minutes Closer to Freedom” In this episode of Thoughts from Maharrey Head, I talk about the importance of conflict in government. Gridlock isn’t always a bad thing! People often complain about “gridlock” in government. But gridlock isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In the minds of America’s founders, government was meant to be adversarial and […]

Thoughts from Maharrey Head #26: Seeing the Individual

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“10 Minutes Closer to Freedom” In this episode of Thoughts from Maharrey Head, I talk about why we should fight our impulse to look at people in terms of groups and instead focus on them as individuals. We tend to look people in terms of groups – blacks, immigrants, gays, refugees, white men, liberals, conservatives, […]

Why do Americans Trust the Government?

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Most Americans trust their government. They shouldn’t. People often reveal this default position in the way they respond to any suggestion that the government might act with intentionally nefarious intent. They will throw around words like “stupid,” “absurd,” and “idiotic,” without actually engaging the argument itself. They view the possibility of intentional government malfeasance so […]